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WHO Classifies Aspartame as “Possibly Carcinogenic”

The IARC’s classification is based on a review of scientific studies that have found a possible link between aspartame consumption and an increased risk of cancer. However, the IARC also notes that the evidence is not conclusive and that more research is needed to determine the true risks of aspartame.

Aspartame is a methyl ester of the aspartic acid-phenylalanine dipeptide. It is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners in the world, and it is found in a wide variety of foods and beverages, including soft drinks, diet foods, and gum.

The IARC’s classification of aspartame as “possibly carcinogenic” is based on a review of 17 studies that have investigated the link between aspartame consumption and cancer. The studies included both animal studies and human studies.

The animal studies found that aspartame exposure was associated with an increased risk of lymphoma and leukemia. The human studies found that aspartame exposure was associated with an increased risk of brain tumors.

However, the IARC also notes that the evidence is not conclusive. The animal studies were not all consistent, and the human studies were observational studies, which means that they cannot prove that aspartame caused the cancer.

The IARC’s classification of aspartame as “possibly carcinogenic” is a precautionary measure. It does not mean that aspartame definitely causes cancer, but it does mean that there is some evidence that it might.

People who are concerned about the potential risks of aspartame should talk to their doctor. The doctor can help them decide whether or not to avoid aspartame.

The IARC’s classification is a precautionary measure, and it does not mean that aspartame is definitely carcinogenic. However, the IARC’s classification does raise concerns about the safety of aspartame, and it is something that people should be aware of when choosing artificial sweeteners.

Aspartame is a synthetic sweetener that is used in a wide variety of foods and beverages, including diet sodas, soft drinks, yogurt, and chewing gum. It is also used in some prescription and over-the-counter medications. Aspartame is 200 times sweeter than sugar, and it is often used as a sugar substitute for people who are trying to lose weight or who have diabetes.

The IARC’s classification of aspartame is based on two animal studies that showed that aspartame can cause cancer in rodents. In one study, rats that were fed aspartame developed lymphomas, and in another study, mice that were fed aspartame developed leukemia. However, there have been no human studies that have shown that aspartame causes cancer.

In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviewed the IARC’s classification of aspartame and concluded that there was no “credible evidence” that aspartame causes cancer in humans. The FDA also stated that aspartame is “one of the most thoroughly studied food additives” and that it is “one of the safest.”

The IARC’s classification of aspartame is a controversial issue, and there is no clear consensus on whether or not aspartame is safe. Some people believe that the IARC’s classification is based on weak evidence, while others believe that the IARC’s classification is a prudent measure. Ultimately, the decision about whether or not to use aspartame is a personal one.

Here are some additional details about the WHO’s classification of aspartame:

  • The IARC is an independent agency that is part of the World Health Organization.
  • The IARC’s classification system is based on a review of scientific evidence.
  • The IARC’s classifications are not definitive, but they are considered to be a reliable guide to the potential risks of exposure to different substances.
  • The IARC’s classification of aspartame as “possibly carcinogenic” does not mean that aspartame definitely causes cancer.
  • More research is needed to determine the true risks of aspartame.

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