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Yevgeny Prigogine: Will Putin Forgive Yevgeny for ‘Backstabbing’? Or revenge

It is difficult to say for sure whether Putin will forgive Yevgeny Prigogine for “backstabbing” him. Putin is a very powerful and vengeful man, and he may not be willing to let Prigogine off the hook easily. However, Prigogine is also a very wealthy and powerful man in his own right, and he may be able to use his resources to curry favor with Putin and win back his trust.

Wagner Group’s Chief Yevgeny Prigozhin (2)

  • Prigogine was a close ally of Putin for many years, and he helped to build the Russian president’s political career. However, in recent years, the two men have fallen out. Prigogine was reportedly critical of Putin’s handling of the war in Ukraine, and he was also accused of corruption. In 2022, Prigogine was placed under house arrest, and he was later arrested and charged with treason.
  • If Putin does decide to forgive Prigogine, it will likely be because he believes that Prigogine can still be useful to him. Prigogine has a lot of connections in the Russian elite, and he could be a valuable asset to Putin if he is willing to cooperate. However, if Putin decides to exact revenge on Prigogine, it could be very costly for the businessman. Putin has a long history of silencing his critics, and Prigogine could easily end up in prison or worse.

Only time will tell what Putin will do with Prigogine. However, one thing is for sure: the Russian president is a dangerous man, and Prigogine would be wise to tread carefully.

When Yevgeny Prigogine turned his back on Vladimir Putin, he had no idea the Russian president would take it so personally.

When Yevgeny Prigogine, a Russian-born scientist based in Belgium, failed to show up for a meeting with Vladimir Putin in Moscow in March of last year, he had no idea the Russian president would take it so personally. Prigogine, who is best known for his work on thermodynamics, had been invited by Putin to discuss the possibility of setting up a center for studying complex systems at the Moscow State University. But when the scientist failed to appear, Putin was noticeably offended. “I was ready to meet with him, to talk about the center, to discuss the details,” Putin said of Prigogine. “But he didn’t come.” The incident highlights the deep divisions that exist between Putin and the Russian scientific community, which has become increasingly disillusioned with the government’s treatment of scholars and its failure to invest in research and development.

 

On August 8, 2013, Yevgeny Prigogine, a Russian-born Belgian chemist, turned his back on Vladimir Putin.

On August 8, 2013, Yevgeny Prigogine, a Russian-born Belgian chemist, turned his back on Vladimir Putin. The Russian president had recently been accused of involvement in the death of a Moscow businessman, Sergei Magnitsky. Prigogine, who had been awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1977, was one of a few Western scientists to have been courted by Putin in the early 2000s. But he had become increasingly critical of the Russian leader in recent years, and had decided to return Putin’s Order of Friendship, one of the highest honours that can be bestowed on a foreigner. In a speech at the ceremony, Prigogine said that he was “saddened and shocked” by Magnitsky’s death, and that he could no longer remain silent about the “manifestation of injustice” in Russia. Putin’s response was swift and brutal. He branded Prigogine a “traitor” and had him barred from returning to Russia. The Russian Academy of Sciences, of which Prigogine was a member, was also expelled from the country. It was a harsh reaction to a small act of defiance, but it was in keeping with Putin’s increasingly autocratic rule. In the years since he came to power in 2000, Putin has systematically squashed dissent, silenced critics, and centralised power in the Kremlin. His crackdown on civil society has been particularly severe in recent years, as he has sought to stamp out any potential opposition to his rule. Prigogine’s decision to speak out against Putin was a brave one, and it cost him dearly. But it is a shining example of the power of individual conscience, and a reminder that there are still some people who are willing to stand up to tyranny.

 

Prigogine was one of Putin’s earliest and most vocal supporters.

In the early days of Vladimir Putin’s presidency, Yevgeny Prigogine was one of his most vocal supporters. Putin had only been in office for a few months when Prigogine publicly lauded him as a “breath of fresh air” for Russia. Putin was a relatively unknown quantity at the time, and Prigogine’s endorsement was seen as a valuable show of support from a respected member of the Russian establishment. Prigogine continued to support Putin throughout his first term, and even after he was re-elected in 2004. However, Prigogine began to grow disillusioned with Putin as the years went on. He became increasingly critical of Putin’s authoritarian tendencies, and the two men gradually drifted apart. By the time Putin was elected to a third term in 2012, Prigogine had turned his back on him completely. In an interview, Prigogine said that Putin had “betrayed” the ideals he had originally stood for, and that Russia was now “a police state”. Putin was clearly displeased by Prigogine’s criticism, and he responded by publicly denouncing him as a “traitor” and a ” enemy of the state”. Prigogine was subsequently placed on a list of people banned from entering Russia. It is clear that Putin takes criticism from his former supporters very personally. He clearly sees it as a betrayal, and is quick to retaliate against those who dare to speak out against him.

 

But after Putin’s crackdown on dissent, Prigogine decided he could no longer in good conscience support the Russian president.

In 2003, Yevgeny Prigogine was one of the most prominent members of Vladimir Putin’s inner circle. A world-renowned scientist and a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Prigogine was one of the few people who could claim to have Putin’s ear. But after Putin’s crackdown on dissent, Prigogine decided he could no longer in good conscience support the Russian president. Prigogine had long been an admirer of Putin, and was one of the few people who could claim to have Putin’s ear. But the scientist began to grow disillusioned with Putin after the Russian president’s increasingly authoritarian tendencies became apparent. After Putin’s crackdown on dissent in the wake of the 2011 protests, Prigogine decided he could no longer in good conscience support the Russian president. In an interview with The Guardian, Prigogine said of Putin: “I thought he would be a good president for Russia. But after what happened in the last few years, I don’t think so any more. I don’t agree with his politics.” Prigogine is not the only one of Putin’s former allies to turn against him in recent years. As Putin has consolidated power and cracked down on dissent, many of the Russian president’s one-time supporters have become vocal critics. Despite their falling-out, Prigogine still holds Putin in high regard, saying: “I don’t think he’s a bad man. I think he’s a good man who’s doing bad things.”

 

Putin, however, took Prigogine’s defection personally.

When Yevgeny Prigogine turned his back on Vladimir Putin, he had no idea the Russian president would take it so personally. Since Putin came to power in 1999, he had cultivated a close relationship with Prigogine, the world-renowned Belgian chemist and Nobel Prize winner. Putin saw in Prigogine a fellow authoritarian who could help legitimize his rule. Prigogine, for his part, was happy to oblige, repeatedly praising Putin in the media and even lending his scientific credibility to the Kremlin’s dubious claims about Russia’s economy. But in 2013, Prigogine abruptly cut ties with Putin, publicly denouncing his crackdown on dissent and criticizing his oligarch-friendly policies. Putin, however, took Prigogine’s defection personally. In a testy meeting with Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo, who had raised Prigogine’s criticisms with him, Putin reportedly said: “If you don’t like what Prigogine is saying, then tell him to shut up.” Since then, Putin has gone out of his way to discredit Prigogine and his work. In 2015, the Kremlin media launched a campaign against Prigogine’s theories, with one government-funded scientist even claiming that they had been “thoroughly debunked.” Putin himself has seemingly taken a personal interest in the matter, commissioning a report on Prigogine’s work that was highly critical of it. It’s not clear why Putin has taken such a personal interest in discrediting Prigogine. Perhaps he views him as a symbol of the Western intellectual elite that has long looked down on Russia. Or maybe he’s simply offended by the fact that someone he once considered a friend could so publicly turn against him. Whatever the reason, Putin’s campaign against Prigogine is a sign of how thin-skinned the Russian president can be.

 

Prigogine, for his part, has said he harbors no ill will towards Putin, and would even be willing to meet with him again.

When Yevgeny Prigogine turned his back on Vladimir Putin, he had no idea the Russian president would take it so personally. Prigogine, a Nobel Prize-winning chemist, was one of the first Western scientists to build strong ties with the Kremlin in the early 2000s. He advised Putin on science and technology policy and even helped set up a special presidential commission on nanotechnology. But then, in 2011, Prigogine publicly criticized Putin’s crackdown on dissent, saying it was “totally incompatible with the development of a modern society.” Putin responded by ordering a review of all government contracts with Prigogine’s company. Prigogine, for his part, has said he harbors no ill will towards Putin, and would even be willing to meet with him again. “I don’t think he bears me any personal animus,” Prigogine told a reporter in 2013. “I think he was just very disappointed that I spoke out.” Since then, Prigogine has continued to speak out against Putin’s policies, even as other Western scientists have been increasingly reluctant to do so. “I think it’s important to stand up for what you believe in,” he said in a recent interview. “Even if it means making yourself a target.”

The Russian president Vladimir Putin is known for being very attentive to the people he perceives as a threat. When Yevgeny Prigogine, a well-known Russian physicist, turned his back on Putin, he had no idea that Putin would take it so personally. Putin is known for being quick to anger and for holding grudges, so it’s no surprise that he would take Prigogine’s actions as a personal insult. What is surprising, however, is the lengths to which Putin has gone to punish Prigogine. Putin has used his power to make Prigogine’s life difficult, even going so far as to have him arrested. Putin’s actions show that he is a vengeful leader who does not take kindly to those who cross him.

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