GeneralNews

Flash flood warning in effect for southeast Kern County: NWS

Yes, a flash flood warning is in effect for southeastern Kern County until 10:00 AM PDT today, August 21, 2023. The warning includes the following areas: The National Weather Service (NWS) is warning of possible flash flooding caused by thunderstorms. The thunderstorms are expected to produce heavy rainfall, up to 2 inches per hour. This could lead to flooding in low-lying areas, along streams and rivers, and underpasses.

  • Bodfish
  • China Lake
  • Kramer Junction
  • Ridgecrest
  • Trona
  • Weldon

The NWS is urging residents to stay away from areas that are prone to flooding and to be prepared to evacuate if necessary. They are also asking residents to monitor the weather conditions and to heed any warnings issued by local officials.

Here are some safety tips to follow during a flash flood warning:

  • Stay away from floodwaters.
  • Do not drive through flooded areas.
  • Move to higher ground if you are in a flood-prone area.
  • Listen to local radio or television for updates on the situation.

If you are caught in a flash flood, here are some things to do:

  • Get to higher ground as quickly as possible.
  • Do not try to drive through floodwaters.
  • Stay away from downed power lines.
  • Be aware of the dangers of swift currents and debris.

If you see someone in danger, call 911 immediately.

NWS: Flash flood warning in effect for southeast Kern County

You will be surprised to know A flash flood warning is in effect for southeast Kern County. This means that flooding is imminent and could happen very quickly. Residents in the affected area should take immediate precautions to protect themselves and their property. Flash flooding can occur when there is a sudden and heavy rainfall. It can also occur when there is a dam or levee failure. When a flash flood warning is issued, it means that flooding is imminent and could happen very quickly. Residents in the affected area should take immediate precautions to protect themselves and their property. This includes moving to higher ground, avoiding low-lying areas, and avoiding areas where water is already flowing. Flash floods can be very dangerous and can cause property damage and even loss of life.

The National Weather Service (NWS) in Hanford has issued a Flash Flood Warning for southeastern Kern County in central California.

The National Weather Service (NWS) in Hanford has issued a Flash Flood Warning for southeastern Kern County in central California. The flash flood warning will be in effect until noon on Thursday, August 1. According to the NWS, a flash flood warning means that flooding is imminent or occurring in the warned area. Motorists are advised to not drive through standing water, and to avoid areas of high water. If you come across a flooded road, turn around and find an alternate route. Flash flooding can occur quickly and without warning. If you find yourself in a situation where water is rising rapidly, get to higher ground immediately. If you are trapped, call 911 and await rescue. This warning is in effect for the following areas: * In central California, southeastern Kern County. This includes the cities of Maricopa, Taft, and Tehachapi. Some locations that will experience flooding include: * Maricopa, Taft, Tehachapi, Buttonwillow, Fellows, Tupman, Selma, Corcoran, Wasco, Shafter, McFarland, Lamont, Arvin, Weldon, Lost Hills, California City, Boron, Weedpatch, Hereford, Ford City, Bakersfield, and Delano. This warning may be extended if the heavy rain persists.

Heavy rain is expected to fall in the area, which could cause flash flooding.

Heavy rain is expected to fall in the area, which could cause flash flooding. Residents in the affected area are advised to take precautions and be prepared for possible flooding.

The NWS urges people in the area to take necessary precautions and be prepared for possible flooding.

Flash flood warning

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for southeast Kern County. This area is particularly vulnerable to flooding during monsoon season. The NWS urges people in the area to take necessary precautions and be prepared for possible flooding. Some tips to stay safe during a flash flood include staying aware of your surroundings, avoiding areas that are prone to flooding, and being ready to evacuate if necessary. If you are caught in a flash flood, the best course of action is to seek higher ground and wait it out. With any flooding situation, it is important to remember that Turn Around, Don’t Drown. Never try to drive through floodwaters. Just a few inches of water can cause your car to lose control or even float away. This can put you and your passengers in a very dangerous situation. If you live in an area that is prone to flooding, it is a good idea to have an emergency kit on hand. This should include items like non-perishable food, water, a first-aid kit, a flashlight, and a radio. This way, you will be prepared if you find yourself stranded due to a flash flood. The best way to stay safe during a flash flood is to be prepared. By following the tips listed above, you can help ensure that you and your loved ones stay safe if a flash flood should occur in your area.

People should avoid low-lying areas, monitor for signs of flooding, and be prepared to evacuate if necessary.

Flash flooding can occur quickly and without warning. It is important for people to avoid low-lying areas, monitor for signs of flooding, and be prepared to evacuate if necessary. Heavy rains can cause flash flooding. Flash floods can happen very quickly, sometimes in just a few minutes. That’s why it’s important to monitor the weather conditions and be prepared to evacuate if necessary. There are a few signs that flooding may be imminent: • Heavy rain is falling or has recently fallen. • Water is rising rapidly in streams, creeks, or rivers. • Roads or bridges are closed due to water over them. • There is a report of a flash flood in the area. If you see any of these signs, take immediate action to protect yourself. Move to higher ground, and if possible, stay with friends or family who live in a safe area. If you must evacuate, do so quickly and safely. Never try to walk, swim, or drive through floodwaters.

Flash floods can develop quickly and are dangerous.

Flooding is one of the most common and widespread natural disasters in the United States. According to the National Weather Service (NWS), flash floods are the leading cause of weather-related fatalities. A flash flood is a sudden, rapid rise in water level that can occur within minutes or hours. Flash floods can develop without any visible sign of precipitation and can occur even when only a small amount of rain has fallen. Flash floods can be extremely dangerous and can catch people off guard. If you are caught in a flash flood, the NWS advises to: -Get to higher ground immediately. -Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. -Do not touch electrically charged objects, such as fences, downed power lines, or appliances. -Do not enter a building that has been flooded. -Do not shelter under an overpass or bridge. If you see floodwaters, remember to Turn Around, Don’t Drown. Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and two feet of water can sweep your vehicle away. Flash floods can cause significant damage to property and infrastructure. In addition to the physical dangers posed by flood waters, flash floods can also contaminate drinking water supplies and lead to the spread of diseases. Flooding is a natural disaster that can occur anywhere in the world. It is important to be aware of the dangers posed by flash floods and to take steps to protect yourself, your family, and your property.

If you see floodwaters, do not attempt to drive through them.

If you see floodwaters while driving, do not attempt to drive through them. Turn around and find another route. If you are caught in a flood while driving, abandon your vehicle and move to higher ground. Do not try to swim to safety.

Turn around and go another way if you encounter water on the road.

If you encounter water on the road, never attempt to cross it. The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood warning for southeast Kern County and water levels are quickly rising. It only takes six inches of fast-moving water to knock you down and two feet of water to carry away a car. If you find yourself in a car that becomes submerged in water, the best thing to do is to stay calm and try to get the attention of someone who can help. Call 911 if you have a cell phone and wait for help to arrive. Never try to walk through floodwaters. The water may be deeper than you think and the current can be incredibly strong. Just six inches of water can knock you down and two feet of water can sweep you away. If you must walk through water, go slowly and steady yourself against a tree or other object so you don’t get swept away. If you encounter water on the road, the best thing to do is to turn around and go another way. With floodwaters rising quickly, it’s not worth the risk to try and cross it. Stay safe and find another route.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a flash flood warning for southeast Kern County. This means that flooding is imminent and could occur very quickly. If you are in the area, you should take immediate action to protect yourself and your property.

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